Shiba Inu dentition and occlusion



The Dentition of Shiba Inu In Shiba Inu's correct dentition, the teeth are arranged at the correct intervals on the dentition line. The dentition is basically U-shaped, but the shape of the dentition greatly depends on the shape of the snout. For example, if the snout is thin, it becomes closer to a V-shape, and if the snout is wide, it becomes a rounded U-shape. If Shiba Inu's head length is regarded as 100%, the ideal snout length is 40%. Longer or shorter snout than this percentage may lead to incongruity in the dentition.



Shiba Inu’s occlusion

The occlusion is also divided into correct and incorrect one. In the correct occlusion, the tip of crown of upper incisors slightly covers each lower incisor like scissors. It is preferable that the lower canine tooth is located in front of the upper canine tooth, and the lower part is lightly covered with upper canine tooth. Premolars and molars should be in the correct positions, lined up facing each other and engaged rightly. Such a correct occlusion is ideal.

However, there are malocclusions such as edge-to-edge bite, undershot, and overshot.


Edge-to-edge bite is an occlusion in which the upper and lower incisors engage at the top edge of both teeth and do not engage like scissors. In this malocclusion, since the incisors directly collide, the teeth are easily worn away and the biting force is weakened. Edge-to-edge bite is also called as level bite. Undershot is a malocclusion that the lower jaw thrust out and the lower incisor protrudes to front compared to the upper incisor. When it comes to malocclusion in Japanese dogs, edge-to-edge bite and undershot have a majority. Undershot is also called as Mandibular prognathism. Overshot is an malocclusion that appears to be correct occlusion, but has an upper incisor overlying the lower incisor. This is due to the tip of the upper jaw thrusting out more than usual, or to a undevelopment of the lower jaw. Overshot is also called as Maxillary prognathism.